Is My Aircraft Airworthy? – Pilot Training TV LIVE

Here’s the recording of my live episode of pilot training TV! Did you miss it? Visit Pilot Training TV to view the show schedule. Is your aircraft airworthy? As a renter it’s crucial you make sure you have all your documents aboard your aircraft. When you rent you don’t know what the person ahead of you may have done. So learn how to check and make sure you have everything covered. Text Transcript It’s way past my bedtime, I’m a little bit tired but I am out here for you guys, I’m certainly giving you my best. This is a live show we’re doing right now. If you’re watching us on PilotTraining.TV, there is a chatbox there. Please feel free to jump into the chatbox and ask me any questions you guys want. A few rules: no spamming, no profanity, none of that stuff or we’d have to give you the boot unfortunately. But given that chatbox, you can ask me any comment you guys wish. So go ahead and submit your comment that way. Also, I have to give a shout out to someone… Matt, who I know is watching right now. Matt,I’d like to thank you personally. For you guys who don’t know, Matt is my hero the weekend, long story, but he’s the whole reason I’m over here live right now and the whole reason my business is still up and rocking. Matt, you’re a blessing and I really appreciate that. Long story, if you guys wanna hear about that, email me and I’ll tell you about it privately. But good story nonetheless. Last week’s episode...

FAA Oxygen Requirements

Getting ready for your checkride? This is a question that’s been coming up quite a bit on the checkrides I’ve sat in on. How will you answer the question when asked? Check out this video. 91.211… what can we find in 91.211? This is one of the biggest checkride questions coming out right now. Examiners are asking either: a) What can we find in 91.211? I’m talking about the FARs by the way. Or, examiners could ask, when do you as a private pilot or any pilot for that matter need to be a supplemental oxygen? Well, Mr. Examiner or Ms. Examiner, would be a great way to start it probably… I’m just kidding about that part. In 91.211, in the FARs, you can learn about supplemental oxygen. In fact, from 12,500 feet to 13,999 feet, if I’m at that altitude for more than 30 minutes, I have to be on supplemental oxygen as required. Let me say that again, from 12,500 feet to 13,999, basically, more than 30 minutes if you’re up there, you have to be on supplemental oxygen. Now, the question your examiner is going to come back and ask you, “Why can’t I just be flap there for 29 minutes and drop down to 11,500 a bit and bump back up?” Well, air traffic control is gonna know what’s going on and that’s simply not gonna fly. That’s not how it works. You need to be on oxygen. 12,500 to 13,999 feet… does that make sense? I’m bad at my numbers sometimes. You need to be on oxygen. Listen to this one. 14,000 feet. At...

Annual Inspection Part 2 & 3

Back by popular demand and with a bit of humor is the rest of my annual inspection. Those of you who have been following the process from part 1 are going to really enjoy this. The first video is another close up of the airplane as we start to put it back together and show the replaced parts. This video is shot right from the cell phone because my hands were filthy! The second video is my “maiden voyage” or test flight right after we put it back together. If we were going to find a problem it was going to be then, so I had to take the camera along. This video contains a bit of humor of what real world flying really is and how crazy some pilots can be. Hint: It involves me conducting a test flight, departing runway 5 while another airplane is approaching runway 23, and still another airplane is holding short on runway 9. I won’t spoil it. Quite funny… Enjoy both videos… – Jason Part Two Part Three Did you miss part one of my annual inspection? Check it out below… Aircraft Annual Inspection Part...

512R’s Annual Inspection

So this week is annual week for my little 150 512R It’s kind of a bummer because when the airplane is on the ground it’s costing me money especially when we find broken parts. Regardless it’s such an awesome learning experience for myself and my flight students who take the time to stop by and help. You’d be amazed at how much you learn being able to work on your own airplane! For those of you who can’t just swing by and see what i’m talking about I took the video camera out and brought you guys along for the trip. Check it out below. Common Annual Question’s How Much Does an Annual Cost? Annual’s are no inexpensive matter unfortunately. My little Cessna 150 512R usually can escape Annual Inspection for under $700 dollars assuming you don’t need any parts and that’s a rare occurrence. Last years annual cost me a hair over $1,200, while this years annual will be right around $900 dollars. It really depends on what you need part wise. How Long Does an Annual Usually Take? Unless your A&P Mechanic isn’t very busy plan on the airplane being down for around a week. Maybe even longer if you have to order parts. How Can I Do Owner Assisted Annuals Like You Do? Simple. Just ask! Most A&P Mechanic’s are thrilled to have someone help them. This is such a great chance for you to learn the true in’s and out’s of your airplane. What Is The Difference Between A 100 Hour Inspection and an Annual? A 100 Hour Inspection is required of any airplane flown...

Aviation Oxygen Requirements

Aviation oxygen requirements are difficult to remember. This video explains when you need oxygen based on your altitude. This can be very important on your checkride be sure you have a good understanding of it. This topic is discussed in my newest book Learn to Fly – Pass your Private Pilot Checkride. Have you grabbed your copy yet? Do so...