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FAA Oxygen Requirements

by Jason Schappert

Getting ready for your checkride? This is a question that’s been coming up quite a bit on the checkrides I’ve sat in on. How will you answer the question when asked? Check out this video.

91.211… what can we find in 91.211? This is one of the biggest checkride questions coming out right now. Examiners are asking either: a) What can we find in 91.211? I’m talking about the FARs by the way. Or, examiners could ask, when do you as a private pilot or any pilot for that matter need to be a supplemental oxygen? Well, Mr. Examiner or Ms. Examiner, would be a great way to start it probably… I’m just kidding about that part.
In 91.211, in the FARs, you can learn about supplemental oxygen. In fact, from 12,500 feet to 13,999 feet, if I’m at that altitude for more than 30 minutes, I have to be on supplemental oxygen as required. Let me say that again, from 12,500 feet to 13,999, basically, more than 30 minutes if you’re up there, you have to be on supplemental oxygen. Now, the question your examiner is going to come back and ask you, “Why can’t I just be flap there for 29 minutes and drop down to 11,500 a bit and bump back up?” Well, air traffic control is gonna know what’s going on and that’s simply not gonna fly. That’s not how it works. You need to be on oxygen. 12,500 to 13,999 feet… does that make sense? I’m bad at my numbers sometimes. You need to be on oxygen.

Listen to this one. 14,000 feet. At 14,000 feet, required crew must be on oxygen. There’s no way around it. And 15,000 feet, you’re still on oxygen. However, your passengers now must be offered oxygen. Now, they don’t have to take it. If they want to get hypoxic and pass out, that’s their deal. 15,000 feet.. offer it to the passengers but they don’t have to accept it. Let’s recap real quick because this is a big checkride question.
Now, where you find this? 91.211. 12,500 to 13,999, if you’re there for more than 30 minutes, you gotta be on oxygen. Okay? 14,000 feet, required crew is required to be on supplemental oxygen. 15,000… you must offer to your passengers, however, they don’t have to accept it.

Hey guys that’s all I have for you this week. Thank you for checking out Pilot Training TV and MzeroA.com. You guys are such a blessing and I appreciate it. If you guys are curious about more checkride questions, you need to check out my Online Ground School or you need to check out my book, Passing Your Private Pilot Checkride.

Hey guys, remember, a good pilot is always learning. See ya.

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  • Jack

    I've heard that at night, there's even less oxygen higher in the atmosphere and that it would probably be advisable to use oxygen if you're flying at a high altitude even if you don't reach 12500 feet. Is that true?

  • mzeroa

    Hey Jack!

    Well Yes and No

    Less Oxygen at night? Not the case. Your eyes work harder in low light conditions thus requiring more oxygen. The FAA “recommends above 10,000 at night however it's simply a recommendation.

    A very good one at that

    Jason

  • Eric

    I believe the FAA recommends oxygen at 5000ft at night. I think I learned that from you Jason? I used your audio books and passed my checkride yesterday!

  • Anonymous

    Eric you are correct! 5,000 feet at night! Why is that?…. Because our eyes strain more at night to see thus requiring more oxygen!

    Glad to hear you passed your checkride with my book! That rocks!

    Jason

  • Anonymous

    Eric you are correct! 5,000 feet at night! Why is that?…. Because our eyes strain more at night to see thus requiring more oxygen!

    Glad to hear you passed your checkride with my book! That rocks!

    Jason

  • Hugh

    Jason,

    I think you made one mistake. According to my recent version of the FAR’s, specifically 91.211: (a) General. No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry — (1) At cabin pressure altitudes above 12,500 feet (MSL) up to and including 14,000 feet (MSL) … (2) At cabin pressure altitudes above 14,000 feet (MSL) …

  • Purelifeglobalstore

    its not “Required”

  • Sung

    There is less O2 at higher altitude? No… the reason you need supplemental oxygen at high altitude is that the atmosphere pressure is lower than ground level. There are still plenty amount of oxygen at high altitude so we can still burn fuel right? However, the pressure differences between inside of our body(Lung to be exact) and outside of an airplane is so close, so we can’t inhale much of oxygen or air compare to on the ground. That’s why we need supplemental oxygen. When you fly at 43,000feet with B747 you don’t need supplemental oxygen, the reason is that turbine engine compress an air and blow into the cabin and keep the air pressure high enough (normally set for 8,000feet), so we can inhale the air even though we fly at 43,000 feet. Is that clear? 

    Sung.
    CFI 

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