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Power On & Power Off Stalls

by Jason Schappert

Learn how to properly enter and most importantly recover from Power On Stalls. Compiling animation and 3D flight paths, this video will not only build your confidence up when it comes to stalls, but it will help you greatly exceed practical test standards.

Power On Stalls Video Transcription

Hi, and welcome to MzeroA’s video podcast, Episode number 9, Power-on STalls. I’m your host, Jason Schappert.

There’s a lot that can be said about power-on stalls. Why we practice them, why we do them. The main thing to remember is, we practice stalls to practice recoveries, not to practice stalls. On a power-on stall, we’re simulating that we’re coming off departure and pitching back too much and stalling the airplane. Today, I’ve compiled a 3D animation for you to watch to learn how to properly enter but most importantly recover from power-on stalls.

Let’s go watch the video.

Before we start a maneuver, we always do a pre maneuver checklist. Part of that checklist is completing our clearing turns. We always start our clearing turns with a 90-degree turn to the left, looking for traffic above us, below us and to the left and right. Also, as part of preparing for our maneuver, we want to verify our Fuel Selector Valves are on Both, our Mixture Rich, our Carb Heat if equipped is off and verify that our Primer is in and locked. After rolling our wings level, we are ready to start our maneuver. In a power-on stall, we simulate that we’re taking off. So we need to slow the airplane down.

If you look at the bottom center of the screen, you can see I slowly bring the RPM’s down to just under 1500. Although we want to slow down, we don’t want to lose altitude so it’s crucial to maintain a little upward pitch. This will help slow the airplane down and help you maintain level flight. Look at our attitude indicator and notice how we’re just a couple degrees above the horizon. As our airspeed indicator slows down to 60, our rotation speed, we can smoothly begin to apply full power and pitch the airplane back simulating we just took off the runway. Notice how our airspeed begins to slow down, our vertical speed indicator shows a climb and our artificial horizon begins to come up. And then, before you know it, we stall.

The airplane may break to the right or the left as seen here. It’s important to stay coordinated and use the rudder to correct any horizontal direction change with the airplane. We already have full power added so it’s important to just get the nose to the horizon or even initiate a shallow climb because, remember, we’re simulating that we’re taking off and we don’t have much altitude underneath us. After recovery, we can cruise the airplane back out.

Let’s take a look at the same stall now looking at our flight path. As we zoom in, you can see we’re flying fairly level here. As we approach the bottom of the arc, we apply full power simulating take off and begin to pitch back. Notice how our flight path looks more like a roller coaster than a shark peak or a triangle like most people think. The airplane begins to slow down. As we reach that stall speed, it slowly goes over the rounded corner, slightly breaks to the right and slightly to the left as we recover quickly here.

Using our simulator, let’s look at a real-life scenario of a possible power-on stall. Here we are at Ocala International Airport, runway 36 where we’re in position and hold.

Ocala Traffic, Cessna 512 Romeo, departing runway three-six at Ocala.

As we smoothly apply full power, our airspeed indicator comes alive and our engine gauges showing in the green. We begin rolling down the runway approaching our rotation speed of 60 knots. As we rotate, we slightly overextend ourselves and begin pitching back way too much. As our airspeed indicator slows down, we get closer and closer to that critical angle of attack and begin to stall. In this stall, it breaks slightly to the left and then to the right before the pilot can recover in time. However, we recovered quickly enough to allow enough separation between us and the ground.


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  • http://www.aviationchatter.com/ Patrick Flannigan

    Good lesson, must have taken a lot of time and effort to make that demo in X-Plane.

  • http://www.aviationchatter.com Patrick Flannigan

    Good lesson, must have taken a lot of time and effort to make that demo in X-Plane.

  • sb

    Is there any reason you demonstrated stalls in what appears to be IMC?

  • sb

    Is there any reason you demonstrated stalls in what appears to be IMC?

  • http://www.JasonSchappert.com/ Jason Schappert

    Thank you for the comment Pat!

    SB,

    The clouds are a SCT layer 2,000 feet below me. Not quite IMC

    -Jason

  • http://www.JasonSchappert.com Jason Schappert

    Thank you for the comment Pat!

    SB,

    The clouds are a SCT layer 2,000 feet below me. Not quite IMC

    -Jason

  • sb

    There’s no visual horizon reference, which makes it IMC. This would be much more useful if it demonstrated how the nose looks relative to the horizon, which is what student pilots should be using for their stall recoveries.

  • sb

    There’s no visual horizon reference, which makes it IMC. This would be much more useful if it demonstrated how the nose looks relative to the horizon, which is what student pilots should be using for their stall recoveries.

  • http://www.JasonSchappert.com/ Jason Schappert

    SB,

    INSTRUMENT METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS (IMC) – Meteorological conditions expressed in terms of visibility, distance from clouds, and ceiling less than minima specified for visual meteorological conditions (VMC).

    I agree that it’s very useful to use the horizon to recover. The reason I showed the instruments as we approached the stall is because that’s all you can really see anyways is instruments and sky.

    Thanks for the comment!

    -Jason

  • http://www.JasonSchappert.com Jason Schappert

    SB,

    INSTRUMENT METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS (IMC) – Meteorological conditions expressed in terms of visibility, distance from clouds, and ceiling less than minima specified for visual meteorological conditions (VMC).

    I agree that it’s very useful to use the horizon to recover. The reason I showed the instruments as we approached the stall is because that’s all you can really see anyways is instruments and sky.

    Thanks for the comment!

    -Jason

  • Rkcruit

    Great job on the video, Jason. It’s very helpful to go through the stall procedures in my mind on the ground VS the difficulty of trying to remember while in the air demonstrating for my instructor. 

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