Runway Incursions

In these 2 videos you’ll learn not only a lot more about runway incursions and how to prevent them. But you’ll also see in the 2nd video that even the pros screw up sometimes. When you get done watch each video be sure to share your comments with me below this post. I’d love to hear your runway incursion stories and how you handled the situation. – Jason




Even The Pro’s Get Confused



  • SolarGuy

    Wow, intense situation! Sure glad it ended well with only a probable reaming out for the United pilots and lots of reports to write, probably. Isn’t there some technology that can take a transponder code and show the Controllers where planes are on the airport? (Yeah I know, transponders are usually kept on standby till ready for t/o but still you would think someone would’ve come up with something by now?)

  • Mike F

    Wow is right! United pilots clearly screwed up, but the controller was way wrong in clearing another take-off.
    Re: SolarGuy’s comment, I recently read (think it was an FAA bulletin) that it’s now recommended transponders be turned to active from standby prior to taxi.

  • Sean

    Fudging bell! Thank goodness the guys in 2998 had some sense. Don’t understand why the controller sounds so urgent/stressed. She should be checking where Kilo is since sounds like she doesn’t know!

  • Great as usual. Funny, you do not look as tall standing on the threshold of the runway. Can practice our obstacle landings with you there.

  • Mike

    Wanna know my comment, this controller is cocky and needs some training. She didn’t even listen. Not one bit.

  • Doug

    This is a clear case of the controller not listening to what the pilots of United 1448 actually realized they were on 23L and said so. The controller just didn’t hear that or was not listening to it. The fact that a plane took off, and the pilot reported a plane taking off should have raised very big red flags. The controller, though replied that you should not be anywhere near an active runway, not conceiving that what the pilot was telling her was that a plane just took off across his nose. At this point the controller should have stopped everything to find out what was going on,
    My hat is off to the pilot of the US 2998 that decided to remain short until the situation was clarified.

  • Tony

    This could have been All Bad. Great thing the pilot of United 2998 had enough common sense to hold shot until ATC and the other pilot got their acts together.

  • mzeroa

    It takes guts to stand down like that too! Again it’s one of those…. “If I was in that situation” sort of things could I have done that..?

    Jason

  • mzeroa

    Ya I’d be willing to bet that controller was looking for a new job after this

  • mzeroa

    Doesn’t it stink how one person having a cocky/grumpy/whatever you call it kind of day could have ruined it for some many other people and families.

    Again when somethings not right just stop and think it through

    Jason

  • mzeroa

    haha All 6 foot 4 of me 🙂

  • mzeroa

    ya totally blew my mind. Slow down and get it right I kept telling the lady through the computer screen hahah

  • Flyingfish

    I recently had a long conversation regarding an incident at Denver. The tower controller didn’t see an aircraft off loading on an active runway. In both cases the PIC and FO were clearly rattled and the controller threw fuel on the fire. The arrogant controller was clearly miffed with the U.S Air pilot who wisly declined take off clearance.
    I think the FAA has recently changed policy requiring two controllers to be on duty, but some investigation is needed to find out why the local traffic controller and the ground controller, same person here, couldn’t see the area where United 1448 was transiting, and next, why wasn’t 1418s ground transponder working. It seems the lessons of Tenerife go unheeded.
    Further, the PIC if 1448 figured out where he was and the controller told him he couldn’t be there. I don’t think she ever pulled out her binoculars or even checked the departure end of 5R/23L for lights Strobes are a good clue that another aircraft is there. The only one who showed good sense was the U S Air pilot who said: ‘I’m not moving until you clear this up.’
    The controller needs to be given some time off and then put back in short pants. Retraining is an understatement, her attitude needs adjusting before she kills someone.

  • mzeroa

    You’re exactly right

  • mzeroa

    They now have exactly what you’re talking about at most large airports (all Class B’s and some Class C’s)

  • Flyingfish

    Got some of my flight numbers mixed below. This incident was undated and many things have recently changed. After the controller fell asleep at DCA and a B 737 pilot had to land at an “uncontrolled airport” the FAA required that two controllers be on duty. In this case only one controller was present. Ground transponders are required at many airports in the last couple of years. I don’t know where this one was or it’s class. Accidents are a collection of errors and breakdowns, never one thing.
    You learn about flying from things like this. It’s painless learning

  • Ralph

    Very cool illustration. I am a student and all the radio communication is still very confusing. Repeat: Best illustration I’ve seen! So what finally happened.

  • This clearly reminds all of us, the WE have the final say in what we do! Sometimes as PIC we need a reminder to actually BE IN COMMAND.

  • David Divoky

    Clearly, the controller had questionable situational awareness as it is obvious that the controller’s failure to see and track
    airport activity from the tower could have led to a disaster. Kudos to the pilot of United 2998. Having the wisdom to hold short and let the confusion be worked out was very prudent.

  • Jerzy

    The controller gave clearance for the plane to take off. Why should it have raised “very big red flags.” The pilot should have clearly stated that a plane took off and nearly hit them, then your flag would have been raised. Play the roll of the controller and LISTEN to what the pilots were saying. I’m not saying the controller was right, but you are wrong.

  • Scary stuff

Share This

Share this post with your friends!